Gay Amputee Andrew Gregory is a Pole Dancing Champion
Fitness

Gay Amputee Andrew Gregory is a Pole Dancing Champion

Screengrab

His talent and grace will blow you away.

When Andrew Gregory sets his mind on something, nothing can stop him. Gregory came to pole (also known as pole dancing) accidentally, and with no background in any sort of dance or acrobatics. In an interview with Attitude, he talked at length about his relationship with the sport.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Andrew Gregory (@tattoo_pole_boy) on

“The feeling when I perform is indescribable. Something takes over as soon as the music plays; you go into autopilot mode.” Gregory’s clear love for pole has taken him to great heights. In October he took gold at the IPSF [International Pole Sports Federation] World Championships in Canada, making him a gay pole champion. He’s also an amputee.

Hold on, let’s rewind.

19 years ago Gregory was in a motorcycle accident that severely damaged his lower leg. After 14 unsuccessful procedures, he still had to take painkillers and use a walking aid to function each day. As his leg continued to deteriorate and the pain harder to manage, it became clear that Gregory had to make a decision.

Related | Trailer for Netflix’s “Special” Follows Life of a Disabled Gay Man

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Andrew Gregory (@tattoo_pole_boy) on

He could either embark on a new round of surgeries that may or may not help, or he could amputate his lower leg. For Gregory, whose relationship with his leg at this point was fraught, the answer was clear.

Related | Why Disabled LGBT Youth Face a Battle for Respect

Gregory had his surgery on 27 February 2018. “I felt a huge relief. It was like I was reclaiming a part of my body, even though I was in fact losing it.” This decision actually improved his confidence. Pre-surgery, Gregory felt like his leg was “misshapen, scarred and ugly,” now he couldn’t be happier.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Andrew Gregory (@tattoo_pole_boy) on

“People tend to ask me about my leg with a sad look on their face, and I think they’re surprised when I tell them how happy I am with it.”

It was because of his amputation that he discovered pole. “I was looking for a form of exercise I could do that would work with my leg,” said Gregory. He was pointed in the right direction and was hooked immediately.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Andrew Gregory (@tattoo_pole_boy) on

Despite the fact that good polers make it look effortless, pole is incredibly difficult. “I had countless blisters in the early days,” said Gregory. Pole as a sport will always have ties with erotic dancing and performances, but it isn’t hard to see how the art form made the acrobatic leap into the sporting world.

Related | Watch Broadway’s Brightest Stars Strip for Broadway Bares

Gregory’s story is also one of body positivity and self-love. “Pole is a very welcoming sport and we celebrate all bodies,” said Gregory. “I spend a lot of time in tiny shorts because skin grip is key on the pole, and it’s amazing how wearing so little makes you more comfortable with your body.”

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Andrew Gregory (@tattoo_pole_boy) on

So what’s next for Gregory? In short — a lot.

“I have more competitions coming up this year [depending on the impact of the coronavirus], I am teaching at the London Dance Academy, and I’m currently working with the Alternative Limb Project on a pole prosthetic that will be part art/part functional.”

Related | Chris Hemsworth’s Becoming a Male Stripper for a New Comedy

Perhaps somewhere in there he can find time for intimacy, too. “I haven’t had sex since the amputation because I don’t know how guys see me if they still find me attractive,” said Gregory. He is understandably wary of contending with a dating scene that so often shuns or fetishized disabled folks.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

A post shared by Andrew Gregory (@tattoo_pole_boy) on

“Although my fear of rejection has increased, I feel I’m just reaching the point where I possibly want to meet a significant other.”

We think he’ll do just fine.

Check out Andrew Gregory’s Instagram and follow his journey.

Gay Amputee Andrew Gregory is a Pole Dancing Champion

Recommended Podcast

To Top